Gosh, the internet can be a really special place. Over the past couple of years I’ve been fortunate to connect IRL with a few of my favorite online buds (Kate! Jessica! TARA!), and yesterday I had a rad skype sesh with Jason Sturgill. I know Jason through his online gallery, the wurst, and we recently reconnected via Instagram. We chatted about his thesis double decker tour bus project and my recent foray into nail school; how being open to the idea of being open can shift and shape the way we interact, converse, and collaborate with folks in our community. I think Jason speaks to the most salient points of our conversation at the end of his Art is Forever video, which documents his tattoo project at the Portland Museum of Art.  
jgspdx:

The internet is awesome. Lately I’ve been connecting with artists in far off places that are interested in the same things that I’ve been exploring in my studies and sharing on this blog and through other things places like Instagram.
If it wasn’t for the internet I wouldn’t have connected and had great Google Hangout sessions with awesome people like Adam from Ambrose and connecting with people I’m inspired by like David Greenberger, Christine Hill, Lee Walton and Tania Bruguera.
Not to mention how we run a lot of our MFA classes where we’re able to hook up with teachers (like Lee and Tania mentioned above) and our students that are participating in the program in distant locales like Sharita Towne in Berlin, or Mark Menjivar in Texas or Dillon De Give in New York City.
This a long way of introducing my latest internet connection which I’m really excited about. Strike that, I should really say, re-connection.
I met Breanne Trammell on the internets way back in 2005 when I was putting together shows for my online art gallery, the wurst, which she participated in called Vintage Vandals. 
We recently re-connected on Instagram since we are both teaching and both of our work has seemed to taken the turn towards being socially engaged and also being really focused on our local community. During our conversation there was a lot of overlap on why we’ve been drawn to working this way and how being actively open to all sort of ways of employing our creativity has led to some really interesting places outside of the traditional art context. 
One of her recent projects she shared with me is a great example of this where she’s collaborating with a neighborhood bar in her town to serve as a dynamic advice column. See the video below and send you own questions seeking advice to their e-mail address here!

Introducing “Ask a Regular” Video Advice Column from The Lantern on Vimeo.
Do you know of a really interesting community based art project? Share it with the rest of the world here.

Gosh, the internet can be a really special place. Over the past couple of years I’ve been fortunate to connect IRL with a few of my favorite online buds (Kate! Jessica! TARA!), and yesterday I had a rad skype sesh with Jason Sturgill. I know Jason through his online gallery, the wurst, and we recently reconnected via Instagram. We chatted about his thesis double decker tour bus project and my recent foray into nail school; how being open to the idea of being open can shift and shape the way we interact, converse, and collaborate with folks in our community. I think Jason speaks to the most salient points of our conversation at the end of his Art is Forever video, which documents his tattoo project at the Portland Museum of Art.  

jgspdx:

The internet is awesome. Lately I’ve been connecting with artists in far off places that are interested in the same things that I’ve been exploring in my studies and sharing on this blog and through other things places like Instagram.

If it wasn’t for the internet I wouldn’t have connected and had great Google Hangout sessions with awesome people like Adam from Ambrose and connecting with people I’m inspired by like David GreenbergerChristine Hill, Lee Walton and Tania Bruguera.

Not to mention how we run a lot of our MFA classes where we’re able to hook up with teachers (like Lee and Tania mentioned above) and our students that are participating in the program in distant locales like Sharita Towne in Berlin, or Mark Menjivar in Texas or Dillon De Give in New York City.

This a long way of introducing my latest internet connection which I’m really excited about. Strike that, I should really say, re-connection.

I met Breanne Trammell on the internets way back in 2005 when I was putting together shows for my online art gallery, the wurst, which she participated in called Vintage Vandals

We recently re-connected on Instagram since we are both teaching and both of our work has seemed to taken the turn towards being socially engaged and also being really focused on our local community. During our conversation there was a lot of overlap on why we’ve been drawn to working this way and how being actively open to all sort of ways of employing our creativity has led to some really interesting places outside of the traditional art context. 

One of her recent projects she shared with me is a great example of this where she’s collaborating with a neighborhood bar in her town to serve as a dynamic advice column. See the video below and send you own questions seeking advice to their e-mail address here!

Introducing “Ask a Regular” Video Advice Column from The Lantern on Vimeo.

Do you know of a really interesting community based art project? Share it with the rest of the world here.

(Source: jgspdx)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 7 notes. .
  1. breannetrammell reblogged this from jgspdx and added:
    Gosh, the internet can be a really special place. Over the past couple of years I’ve been fortunate to connect IRL with...
  2. veronicagrow reblogged this from jgspdx
  3. jgspdx posted this